Safety Tip #1, Avoid Microsoft Web Browsers

Internet Safety Tip #1

Avoid the use of Microsoft Edge or Internet Explorer web browsers. At Design Computer we recommend Google Chrome.Avoid Microsoft Web Browsers

Pros: 
Better compliance with the World Wide Web Consortium’s standards and much more secure browsing.

Cons:
Some poorly designed, and usually insecure, websites and plug-ins require Microsoft’s antiquated Internet Explorer.

Difficulty: Easy

Details (AKA The Long Version):

Switching Internet browsers may be the easiest thing you can do to improve your online security. A computer hacking contest called Pwn2Own is held annually at the CanSecWest security conference. For 2017 Microsoft’s Edge came off as the least secure browser and Google Chrome as the best. The 2016 results were the same. How about 2015? If you guessed that a Microsoft browser was the worst and Chrome the best, you’re right.

While the Edge is much more secure than Internet Explorer, Chrome is the clear choice for those who are concerned about security.

So why wouldn’t everyone use Chrome exclusively? There are many old plug-ins and some websites that require Microsoft’s looser security model in order to work. One example of this is some cheap security cameras made in China that require Microsoft’s ActiveX controls. If you absolutely must use a Microsoft browser for one of these applications, then it is best to use it ONLY for that app and use Chrome for everything else.

Get Google Chrome:

A Comparison Of Web Browser:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_web_browsers

Read about the hacking contest called Pwn2Own:
https://cansecwest.com/
http://www.techradar.com/…/microsoft-edge-comes-last-in-bro…
https://venturebeat.com/…/pwn2own-2016-chrome-edge-and-saf…/

#DesignComputerSafetyTips

Safety Tip #2, Verify SSL Connection

Internet Safety Tip #2

Develop a habit of checking for an SSL Connection (Secure Sockets Layer) BEFORE logging in or entering ANY information in a web form.

Verify Your SSL Connection

Pros: 
The information you receive and enter travels over the network encrypted. This usually makes it extremely difficult for others to monitor your communication as it travels between your computer and the website’s server.

Cons:
You need to learn how your browser shows you that your connection is secure and remember to check for the “https” in the URL Address Bar.

Difficulty: Easy

Details (AKA The Long Version):
When you connect to a website via https versus http, a complicated security handshake occurs. If this handshake is successful the browser will indicate that the connection is SSL Secure. In Google Chrome it does this by adding the word Secure and a Lock image to the Address Bar. Most legitimate websites that require ANY KIND of log-on will use SSL. It is important to remember that if you don’t have a secured connection your web traffic is EASILY READABLE on the Local Area Network as well as other places using a packet sniffer. Many criminals have been caught setting up packet sniffers on free Wi-Fi networks in coffee shops, hotels, airports etc.

Having a secure connection is not enough. You also need to learn how to verify you are really connected to who you think you are. More next time.

SSL:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transport_Layer_Security

Packet Sniffers:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Packet_analyzer

How easy is it to capture data on public free Wi-Fi? – Gary explains:
http://www.androidauthority.com/capture-data-open-wi-fi-72…/

#DesignComputerSafetyTips

Internet Safety Tip #3, Avoid PUPs

Internet Safety Tip #3

Don’t just click through installing ANY software on your computer or phone. It is important to avoid installing PUPs (Potentially Unwanted Programs). Pay special attention to any “optional” offers that are often selected automatically.

Avoid PUPs

Pros: 
This is one of the easiest ways to avoid installing adware or malware.

Cons:
You need to slow down and read. You might not be able to install the software you want without installing something else. In this case, just say no.

Difficulty: Easy

Details (AKA The Long Version):
It is almost impossible to purchase a computer today that isn’t already loaded down with adware before you turn it on. Many “free” programs, plug-ins, and phone apps include adware to help fund their development, and some include dangerous malware. Nothing is really “free”.

PUPs:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potentially_unwanted_program

Adware:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adware

Malware:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malware